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Table 2 Breastfeeding education and breastfeeding educator of 396 mother-newborn pairs interviewed

From: Delayed initiation of breastfeeding in Bukavu, South Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo: a cross-sectional study

Variables
n = 396
Rural
n (%)
Urban
n (%)
Quality of breastfeeding educationa
 None 81 (50.0) 54 (23.0)
 Bad 31 (19.1) 55 (23.5)
 Good 50 (30.9) 125 (53.5)
Time to first breastfeed
 Median (IQR) 50 min (15 – 120) 57 min (15 – 180)
 Median (Range) 50 min (0 – 4320) 57 min (0 – 4320)
Early initiation of breastfeeding
 Yes 147 (69.7) 114 (61.6)
 No 64 (30.3) 71 (38.4)
Breastfeeding education before this pregnancy
 Yes 153 (72.5) 110 (59.5)
 No 58 (27.5) 75 (40.5)
Breastfeeding education during this pregnancy
 Yes 159 (75.4) 115 (62.2)
 No 52 (24.6) 70 (37.8)
Breastfeeding education before and during this pregnancy
 Yes 149 (70.6) 100 (54.1)
 No 62 (29.4) 85 (45.9)
Breastfeeding counsellor (n = 274)
 Family 4 (2.5) 3 (2.6)
 Neighbour 1 (0.6) 1 (0.9)
 Personal documentation 0 7 (6.1)
 Health professional (midwives, nurses or physician) 154 (96.9) 104 (90.4)
  1. IQR interquartile range
  2. a The breastfeeding education guideline of the study area was: (i) to place newborn in skin-to-skin contact with his mother immediately after birth, (ii) to initiate breastfeeding within 1 h after birth and (iii) to exclusively breastfeed the child until 6 months of age. Breastfeeding education was described as “good” if the mother knew at least 2 of these 3 items, and “bad” if the mother knew only one item or none