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Table 2 Summary of the main precipitating factors for adding other food or fluids among those mothers who failed to EBF for 6 months

From: Enablers and barriers to success among mothers planning to exclusively breastfeed for six months: a qualitative prospective cohort study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Mother ID Health system Mother-baby factors Family pressure Returning to Work/School
W03: Urban, HIV positive Advised by the nurse to stop breastfeeding at three months upon returning to work    
M05: Rural, Other    Pressured by aunt to give traditional medicine at one month  
M09: Rural, HIV positive   Mother perceived milk insufficiency at five months   
W10: Urban, Teenager Advised by the nurse to give water within one month    
M13: Rural, Teenager     Introduced formula milk upon returning to school at two months
M14: Rural, Working     Baby given water with sugar while mother was at work at three months
M15: Rural, Teenager    Pressured by the grandmother to introduce complementary foods at two months  
W15: Urban, Other Advised by the nurse to give water at three months    
W17, Urban, Teenage   Mother perceived milk insufficiency at four months   
W19: Urban, Teenager Baby given pre-lacteal feeds at the hospital within one week    
M19: Rural, Other   Baby given water because breastmilk not coming out during the first three days   
M22: Rural, Teenager    Instructed by her mother (child’s grandmother) to feed the baby soft solids at four months  
M24: Rural, HIV positive     Mother struggled to express at work and introduced formula milk at three months
W30: Urban, Teenager   Baby struggled to latch and was given formula milk at one month   
W31: Urban, Working Baby given pre-lacteal feeds at the hospital within one week    
W47: Urban, HIV positive   Baby not getting full from breast alone at five months   
W49: Urban, Other    Advised by her mother to add porridge at three months  
Total no of mothers 5 5 4 3